German Review of the Cases

Beginner German - Level A2

Overview

As you know well by now, for native English speakers, one of the most challenging aspects of learning German, at least initially, can be the fact that each noun, pronoun, and article has four cases. Depending on how a given word is used—whether it's the subject, a possessive, or an indirect or a direct object—the spelling and the pronunciation of that noun or pronoun changes... Let's take a quick review of these cases.

  • The nominative case—in both German and in English—is the subject of a sentence.
  • In English, the accusative case is known as the objective case (direct object).
  • In addition to its function as the indirect object, the dative is also used after certain dative verbs and with dative prepositions. 
  • The genitive case in German shows possession. In English, this is expressed by the possessive "of" or an apostrophe with an "s" ('s).
language250Asset 173@250x-8

Back to the Course

Hi, you can review other topics from this course level.

German A2

Visit the Shop

Visit the Shop

Start classes with one of our professional teachers today.

Visit the Shop

Review of the 4 German Cases

When trying to identify what case we are dealing with in German, there are a few helpful things to keep in mind. Identifying the subject in the sentence usually leads us to the nominative case. Identifying the direct object helps us identify the accusative. Finding the indirect object helps us identify the dative case, and identifying possession of a noun helps us find the genitive. 

Cases help us demonstrate the relationship between nouns. A noun is typically used with either a definite article ("the"), an indefinite article ("a/an") a negative article ("no") or a possessive adjective/article ("my/your", etc). In German, nouns always have an assigned gender (masculine, feminine, neuter), and each case has its own set of definite, indefinite, negative and possessive articles for masculine, feminine and neutral nouns. Each case also comes with its own set of pronouns. 

1. Der Nominativ (Nominative)

The nominative case is the subject case. If the subject of a sentence is a person (I, you, he, she, it, we, you, they), then we use the subject pronouns: 

Subject Pronouns Nominative

If a noun is in the nominative, we use the following definite, indefinite and negative articles, depending on the gender of the noun:

Nominative Only

If the noun in the nominative belongs to someone, we use a possessive article/adjective. 

Nominative Possessive

When formulating a sentence with a nominative noun, we need to pay attention to the gender of the noun, and what article we are using. 

Examples: 
Das ist der / ein / kein / mein Laptop.   This is the / a / no / my laptop. 
Das ist die / eine / keine / meine Flasche.   This is the / a / no / my bottle. 
Das ist das / ein / kein / mein Auto.   This is the / a / no / my car. 

 

2. Der Akkusativ (Accusative)

The accusative case is the case of the direct object. We can identify the direct object by asking who or what is being verbed by the subject. When a person is the direct object (for example: She calls him), then we need to use accusative pronouns. 

Accusative pronouns

If a noun is in the accusative, we use the following definite, indefinite and negative articles, depending on the gender of the noun:

Accusative Only

If the noun in the accusative belongs to someone, we use a possessive article/adjective. 

Accusative Possessive

Examples:
Ich trinke den / einen / keinen / meinen Kaffee.    I drink the / a / no / my coffee. 
Ich trinke die / eine / keine / meine Milch.    I drink the / a / no / my milk. 
Ich trinke das / ein / kein / mein Bier.    I drink the / a / no / my beer. 


3. Der Dativ (Dative) 

The dative case is the case of the indirect object. To identify the indirect object, we should first find the subject (Who is doing the verb), then the direct object (what this person is "verbing"?), and lastly the indirect object (to home is this person verbing the direct object?). (for example: He is writing her an email.)
When a person is the indirect object in a sentence, we use dative pronouns: 

Dative Pronouns

If a noun is in the dative, we use the following definite, indefinite and negative articles, depending on the gender of the noun:

Dative Only

If the noun in the dative belongs to someone, we use a possessive article/adjective. 

Dative Possessives

Examples:
Ich gebe dem / einem / keinem / meinem Nachbarn ein Geschenk. 
I give the / a / no / my neighbor a present. 
Ich schreibe der /  einer / keiner / meiner Kollegin eine Email. 
I write the / a / no / my colleague an email. 
Ich gebe dem / einem / keinem / meinem Kind ein Buch. 
I give the / a / no / my child a book. 



4. Der Genitiv (Genitive)

The genitive case is used when a noun in a sentence belongs to another noun in the sentence. We can usually identify the genitive by thinking "of the" in English. For example: The color of the car is red. In this example "of the car" in German would be in the genitive case. We could also say "The car's color", which would also be the genitive. We can not use independent personal pronouns in the genitive. If a noun is in the genitive, we use the following definite, indefinite and negative articles, depending on the gender of the noun:

Genitive Only

The genitive case is the only case that can also change the spelling of the noun itself. Masculine and neutral nouns usually add "-s" or "-es". Feminine and plural nouns do not change. If we need to express possession of the noun that belongs to another noun (the car of my son), then we use the possessive articles in the genitive below. 

Genitive Possessives

Examples:
Das Auto des / eines / keines / meines Sohnes ist rot. 
The car of the / a / no / my son is red. 
Das auto der / einer / keiner / meiner Tochter ist rot. 
The car of the / a / no / my daughter is red. 
Das Auto des / eines / keines meines Kindes ist rot. 
The car of the / a / no / my child is red. 

 

Don't miss out!

Hi there, you are currently not signed in.

CORE Languages students who are signed in get credit for daily engagement while studying. Additionally, save your quiz and test grades by logging in. Even if you are just a language buff wanting to get a bit more studying in, Sign In and receive weekly content updates, access to Free PDF guides and special pricing on online training from our shop.

Additional Activities

Review the unit lesson above and complete additional activities to build your understanding of this topic. For the activities listed below, make sure you are signed in to keep track of your progress, to receive our weekly topics e-mail and special promotions! We are letting you know, you are not signed in. And progress will not be saved.

 

Nominative • for the subject of a sentence • for predicate nouns
Accusative • for the direct object of a sentence • after the accusative prepositions and postpositions • time expressions in a sentence are usually in accusative
Dative • for the indirect object of a sentence • after the dative prepositions • after dative verbs: helfen, danken, gefallen, gehören, schmecken, passen • with some adjectives which describe a condition • the preposition “in” often uses the dative case
Genitive • possession, ownership, belonging to or with • “of” in English, when referring to a part or component of something else • in addition, there are a handful of prepositions that require the genitive

 

Frau: Entschuldigung? Können Sie mir vielleicht sagen, wo ich von hier zur Uni komme?

Herr: Ja klar. Die Uni ist nicht weit. Möchten sie zu Fuß laufen, oder mit dem Bus?

Frau: Es kommt darauf an wie weit es ist.

Herr: Na ja, man geht bestimmt eine dreiviertel Stunde.

Frau: Oje! Das ist mit zu weit. Also, ich nehme lieber den Bus. Ich muss um spätestens 1.30 Uhr an der Uni sein.

Herr: Ja, dann sind sie gleich da. Der Bus kommt alle 10 Minuten, und er hat selten Verspätung.

Frau: Ah, Super. Und wo fährt er genau?

Herr: Also, gehen sie einfach das bis ans Ende des Gleises, und nehmen sie den Nordausgang. Dann einfach über die Straße. Linie 12.

Frau: Sehr gut. Vielen Dank. Wissen sie, ob ich da noch an einem Geldautomaten vorbeikomme?

Herr: Ja, direkt am Südeingang des Bahnhofs. Also, auf der anderen Seite.

Frau: Ah, ok. Dann lauf ich noch schnell am Automaten vorbei. Vielen Dank für Ihre Hilfe.

Herr: Kein Problem. Schönen Tag noch!

Frau: Ebenfalls. Tschüss!


Vocabulary:
zu Fuß - by/on foot
darauf ankommen - to depend
dreiviertel - three quarters
spätestens - at the latest
die Verspätung(en) - the delay
der Eingang(gänge) - the entrance
der Geldautomat(en) - the ATM

Questions
1. When was the genitive used in the text?
2. When was the noun "der Bus" used, and what case was it in each time?
3. How long is the walk from the train station to the university?
4. How often does the bus run?
5. Where is the ATM?
 
Answers
1. des Gleises (of the track), des Bahnhofs (of the train station)
2. mit dem Bus (dative), ich nehme  lieber den Bus (accusative), der Bus kommt  (nominative), 
3. It's about 45 minutes (three quarters of an hour)
4. It runs every 10 Minutes. 
5. The ATM is directly at the South entrance to the train station. 
1. Identify the case of the italic noun in the sentences below. 
   a. Ich trinke morgens gerne einen Kaffee
   b. Ich muss meiner Kollegin noch eine Email schreiben. 
   c. Er wird mir den Bericht morgen schicken. 
   d. Wir sprechen mit dem Geschäftsführer des Ladens
   e. Die Kinder spielen im Garten. 

2. Insert the definite article in the sentences below
   a. Ich backe ____ Kuchen erst morgen. 
   b. Ich gebe ____ Kind das Buch zum Geburtstag. 
   c. ___ Frau arbeitet samstags nicht. 
   d. Das Auto ____ Mannes ist in der Werkstatt. 
   e. Ich singe ____ Kindern ein Lied vor. 

3. Insert the correct personal pronoun for the first person singular "I""
   a. Mein Hund hat ____ gesehen. 
   b. ___ gehe morgen nicht in die Arbeit. 
   c. Kannst du ____ die Email heute noch schicken? 
   d. Ruf ___ bitte sofort an! 
   e. Er wird ____ das Geschenk morgen mitbringen. 

4. In the sentences below, try to identify the nominative, dative and accusative noun
   a. Wir müssen euch das Geschenk morgen mitbringen. 
   b. Die Mutter gibt ihrem Kind das Spielzeug. 
   c. Die Kinder spielen mit dem Spielzeug. 
   d. Ich gebe dem Hund meines Nachbarns ein Leckerli.
   c. Ich zeige meiner Kollegin den Bericht meines Chefs. 

1.a. einen Kaffee = accusative 
   b.  meiner Kollegin = dative  
   c.  den Bericht = accusative 
   d.  des Ladens. = genitive 
   e. Die Kinder  = nominative 

2.a. Ich backe den Kuchen erst morgen. 
   b. Ich gebe dem Kind das Buch zum Geburtstag. 
   c. Die Frau arbeitet samstags nicht. 
   d. Das Auto des Mannes ist in der Werkstatt. 
   c. Ich singe den Kindern ein Lied vor. 

3.a. Mein Hund hat mich gesehen. 
   b. Ich gehe morgen nicht in die Arbeit. 
   c. Kannst du mir die Email heute noch schicken? 
   d. Ruf mich bitte sofort an! 
   e. Er wird mir das Geschenk morgen mitbringen. 

4.a. Wir (nominative) müssen euch (dative) das Geschenk (accusative) morgen mitbringen. 
   b. Die Mutter (nominative) gibt ihrem Kind (dative) das Spielzeug. (accusative)
   c. Die Kinder (nominative) spielen mit dem Spielzeug. (dative)
   d. Ich (nominative) gebe dem Hund (dative) meines Nachbarns (genitive)  ein Leckerli.(accusative)
   c. Ich (nominative) zeige meiner Kollegin (dative)  den Bericht (accusative) meines Chefs (genitive)
 

Listen to the audio and try to answer the following questions.

 

Questions

  1. When was the genitive case used?
  2. Find all the pronouns in this sentence and identify what case they are.
  3. When was the accusative used?
  4. Who can watch the dog?
  5. What kind of dog is Milo?

 Answers

  1. “meines Nachbarn (of my neighbor), meines Nachbarn (of my neighbor), unseres Hauses (of our house), meiner Frau (of my wife), der Welt (of the word)
  2. sie (she – nominative), er (he – nominative), ich (I – nominative), ihn (him – accusative), ich (I – nominative), ihn (him – accusative), ich (I – nominative), ich (I – nominative), wir (we – nominative), sie (she – nominative), ich (I – nominative), es (it – nominative), er (he – nominative), wir (ich – nominative), Ich (I nominative), ihn (him – accusative), ich (nominative) ihm – (him – dative), er (he – nominative)
  3. see all accusative above, as well as: “einen kleinen Schäferhund”, “ein neues Zuhause”, „Milo“, „einen Hund“, „Milo“, „jeden Tag“.
  4. His wive’s brother can watch the dog.
  5. Milo is a shepherd puppy (probably a German shepherd, but he does not specify)
 

Transcript

Also, die Frau meines Nachbarn arbeitet in einem Tierheim. Letztens hat sie einen kleinen Schäferhund nach Hause gebracht, bis er ein neues Zuhause findet. Ich habe mich sofort in ihn verliebt. Silke, so heisst die Frau meines Nachbarn, meinte, wenn ich Milo haben möchte, könnte ich ihn sofort adoptieren. Also, ich hätte fast sofort „Ja“ gesagt, aber natürlich muss ich erst mit meiner Frau darüber reden.„Wir hatten noch nie einen Hund“, meinte sie. Aber ich finde, das macht nichts. Es gibt für alles ein erstes Mal. Der Garten unseres Hauses ist gross genug, und der Bruder meiner Frau meinte schon er könne jeder Zeit auf Milo aufpassen. Also haben wir ja gesagt! Ich liebe ihn! Ich spiele jeden Tag mit ihm. Er ist der beste Hund der Welt.

Vocabulary

das Tierheim(e) - the animal shelter
der Schäferhund(e) - the shepherd dog
adoptieren - to adopt
Es gibt für alles ein erstes Mal - There is a first time for everything. 
aufpassen - to watch, take care of

 

We love new fresh content! Find some of our favorite links on this Unit topic below. If any links are expired, please let us know.

What do you know?

You can complete the following quiz to see if you truly understand this unit's content.